Emotional Intelligence

In 1995, psychologist and science journalist Daniel Goleman published a book introducing most of the world to the nascent concept of emotional intelligence. The idea–that an ability to understand and manage emotions greatly increases our chances of success–quickly took off, and it went on to greatly influence the way people think about emotions and human behavior.

13 Indicators of a Highly Emotional Intelligence Individuals

In 1995, psychologist and science journalist Daniel Goleman published a book introducing most of the world to the nascent concept of emotional intelligence. The idea–that an ability to understand and manage emotions greatly increases our chances of success–quickly took off, and it went on to greatly influence the way people think about emotions and human behavior.

But what does emotional intelligence look like, as manifested in everyday life?

I’ve identified a number of actions that illustrate how emotional intelligence appears in the real world. Here are 13 of them:

1. You think about feelings.

Emotional intelligence begins with what is called self- and social awareness, the ability to recognize emotions (and their impact) in both yourself and others. That awareness begins with reflection. You ask questions like:

• What are my emotional strengths? What are my weaknesses?

• How does my current mood affect my thoughts and decision making?

• What’s going on under the surface that influences what others say or do?

Pondering questions like these yield valuable insights that can be used to your advantage.

2. You pause.

The pause is as simple as taking a moment to stop and think before you speak or act. (Easy in theory, difficult in practice.) This can help save you from embarrassing moments or from making commitments too quickly. In other words, pausing helps you refrain from making a permanent decision based on a temporary emotion.

3. You strive to control your thoughts.

You don’t have much control over the emotion you experience in a given moment. But you can control your reaction to those emotions–by focusing on your thoughts. (As it’s been said: You can’t prevent a bird from landing on your head, but you can keep it from building a nest.) By striving to control your thoughts, you resist becoming a slave to your emotions, allowing yourself to live in a way that’s in harmony with your goals and values.

4. You benefit from criticism.

Nobody enjoys negative feedback. But you know that criticism is a chance to learn, even if it’s not delivered in the best way. And even when it’s unfounded, it gives you a window into how others think. When you receive negative feedback, you keep your emotions in check and ask yourself: How can this make me better?

5. You show authenticity.

Authenticity doesn’t mean sharing everything about yourself, to everyone, all of the time. It does mean saying what you mean, meaning what you say, and sticking to your values and principles above all else. You know not everyone will appreciate your sharing your thoughts and feelings. But the ones who matter will.

6. You demonstrate empathy.

The ability to show empathy, which includes understanding others’ thoughts and feelings, helps you connect with others. Instead of judging or labeling others, you work hard to see things through their eyes. Empathy doesn’t necessarily mean agreeing with another person’s point of view. Rather, it’s about striving to understand–which allows you to build deeper, more connected relationships.

7. You praise others.

All humans crave acknowledgement and appreciation. When you commend others, you satisfy that craving and build trust in the process. This all begins when you focus on the good in others. Then, by sharing specifically what you appreciate, you inspire them to be the best version of themselves.

8. You give helpful feedback.

Negative feedback has great potential to hurt the feelings of others. Realizing this, you reframe criticism as constructive feedback, so the recipient sees it as helpful instead of harmful.

9. You apologize.

It takes strength and courage to be able to say you’re sorry. But doing so demonstrates humility, a quality that will naturally draw others to you. Emotional intelligence helps you realize that apologizing doesn’t always mean you’re wrong. It does mean valuing your relationship more than your ego.

10. You forgive and forget.

Hanging on to resentment is like leaving a knife inside a wound. While the offending party moves on with their life, you never give yourself the chance to heal. When you forgive and forget, you prevent others from holding your emotions hostage–allowing you to move forward.

11. You keep your commitments.

It’s common nowadays for people to break an agreement or commitment when they feel like it. Of course, bailing on an evening of Netflix with a friend will cause less harm than breaking a promise to your child or missing a major business deadline. But when you make a habit of keeping your word–in things big and small–you develop a strong reputation for reliability and trustworthiness.

12. You help others.

One of the greatest ways to positively impact the emotions of others is to help them. Most people don’t really care where you graduated from, or even about your previous accomplishments. But what about the hours you’re willing to take out of your schedule to listen or help out? Your readiness to get down in the trenches and work alongside them? Actions like these build trust and inspire others to follow your lead when it counts.

13. You protect yourself from emotional sabotage.

You realize that emotional intelligence also has a dark side–such as when individuals attempt to manipulate others’ emotions to promote a personal agenda or for some other selfish cause. And that’s why you continue to sharpen your own emotional intelligence–to protect yourself when they do.

Candid Conversations

Have you been dodging an important conversation? The kind of conversation that may be uncomfortable, in a situation that you wish would just take care of itself? Are you dancing around a subject, being less direct, less candid than you really should be because you fear conflict or don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings?

Have you been dodging an important conversation? The kind of conversation that may be uncomfortable, in a situation that you wish would just take care of itself? Are you dancing around a subject, being less direct, less candid than you really should be because you fear conflict or don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings? Preparing for candid conversations can be hard.

You know what’s going to happen, right? As a result of not being candid, we can let situations like this stew and brew until they erupt and end up causing more damage than was necessary. It’s only a matter of time before one of you gets so frustrated by what’s unspoken that you will say things that shouldn’t be said instead of having a candid conversation about what needs to be discussed.

But you’d rather risk handling a ticking time bomb than put in the time and effort and emotional risk of having THAT conversation. I know. I’ve felt the same way at times. You’ll have to weigh the stakes of speaking up versus letting this one fester. Just don’t wimp out if the stakes of doing so are greater than those few moments of discomfort required to initiate the conversation.

If you decide to go for it, to have a candid conversation, here are some tips that may make it more productive. (I didn’t say these would make it any easier, but that is a possibility. … for now, let’s focus on at least getting somewhere with the conversation.)

First, know what it means to be candid. It’s doesn’t mean you have the green light to be unkind or to go on the attack. In fact, to be effective at being candid, you have to put some real thought and objectivity into your preparation. Candor means “the state or quality of being frank, open, and sincere in speech or expression; free from reservation, disguise, or subterfuge; straightforward.” The synonyms for candor are: matter-of-fact, frank, flat-out, plainspoken, straightforward, direct. It’s all about being truthful in a way that someone else can find constructive support in what you say to them.

Preparing for a Candid Conversation: 7 Checks

To prepare yourself for candid conversations, take these seven steps before you tackle the conversation. These will boost your confidence and help you reign in your emotions. Going into the conversation with the right intent minimizes the other party’s defensiveness and means the conversation is less likely to devolve into an emotionally-charged exchange.

  1. Have clarity of purpose.
  2. Identify emotional triggers.
  3. Check your assumptions.
  4. Focus on the positive outcomes.
  5. Consider the other perspective.
  6. Organize your thoughts and back up your key points with specifics and examples.
  7. Plan for “We” and “I” (not “You”) statements.

These are simple preparations. We often shortchange their importance because we are acting on our own emotion or we feel we’re too time-taxed to take these steps. But it’s charging into these candid conversations without being thoughtfully prepared that becomes a time drain. Not only does the conversation itself take longer, but we put obstacles and hurt feelings in our relationships that may take a long time to heal. It is worth the time to think and prepare before you speak candidly.

Preparing for Candid Conversations: 4 Neutral Statement Ideas

So now you’re ready for the conversation… Be sure to open it up with a neutral statement, one that doesn’t accuse or blame. Here are some ideas for good openings:

  • “I’d like to discuss ______. And I’d like to start by understanding your point of view.”
  • “I think we have different perceptions about _______. Tell me your thoughts.”
  • “I have something I’d like to discuss with you that I think will help us work together more efficiently.”
  • “Let’s talk about what just happened.”

You’ll notice that these conversations start by being inclusive and open. You’ll be operating with an assumption that there really are two sides to every story. Rather than entering into the conversation to force your own agenda, you are seeking first to understand. To do that throughout the conversation, you’ll want to inquire with an open mind. Then you should acknowledge the other party’s position and that you’ve heard and understood what they had to say. Don’t race through these first two steps –– they are extremely important because we all just want to be heard and understood.

Once you’ve truly heard and understood, you can advocate your position without attacking the other party’s position. This isn’t about a point-for-point competition. In fact, there may be aspects of the situation where you are both right. So consider collaborating to build a mutually agreeable solution. If the conversation does become adversarial, go back to one of the opening statements and follow this process through again and again.

Maintain your own objectivity throughout. If emotions get out of control, call a time out and refocus on your preparation steps. Remind yourself that you want a productive outcome and a preserved relationship more than you want to have your emotional release. Tirades, dressings down, woe-is-me whining, and tears won’t get you want you really want from this conversation. Keep yourself in check.

Preparing for Candid Conversations: 8 Cautions

Here’s a list of cautions. You’ll know you’re going too far outside the boundaries and that the conversation is becoming unproductive if:

  • You don’t maintain objectivity.
  • You resort to blaming or shaming.
  • You use superlatives (always, never).
  • You do not offer specifics & examples.
  • You beat around the bush.
  • You minimize and apologize.
  • You “protect” someone from the truth.
  • Your message is not clear.

You can do this. You have the time, and you have the spine. All you need to do is prepare yourself and proceed.

Are you a Leaner or Lifter?

Studies show some critically important facts about the workplace. First, the number one reason people leave their jobs is that they don’t feel appreciated. Also, 9 out of 10 people say they are more productive when they are around positive people.

Leadership is your ability to lift and lead others!!!

Every single person you meet – needs to be lifted to higher level. That is leadership. Does your presence in another’s life – lift them.

Are You a Lifter or Leaner?

There are just two kinds of people on earth today,

Just two kinds of people, no more, I say.

There are just two kinds of people on earth today,

Not the rich and the poor, for to count a man’s wealth

You must first know the state of his conscience and health.

Not the humble and proud, for, in life’s little span,

Who puts on airs is not counted a man.

Not the happy and sad, for the swift counting years

Bring each man his laughter and each man his tears.

No, the two kinds of people on earth I mean

Are the people who lift and the people who lean.

Wherever you go you will find the world’s masses

Are always divided in just these two classes.

And oddly enough you will find, too, I ween,

There’s only one lifter to twenty who lean.

In which class are you?

Are you easing the load

Of overtaxed lifters who toil down the road?

Or are you a leaner who lets others bear

Your portion of labour and worry and care?

– Ella Wheeler Wilcox –

Studies show some critically important facts about the workplace. First, the number one reason people leave their jobs is that they don’t feel appreciated. Also, 9 out of 10 people say they are more productive when they are around positive people. One study found that negative employees can scare off every client they come in contact with – for good!

Answer these questions if you are serious about becoming a Lifting Leader!

  • Are you Willing to Invest in Others?

Are you willing to invest in other people? You may build a beautiful house, but eventually it will crumble. You may develop a fine career, but one day it will be over. You may save a great sum of money, but you can’t take it with you. You may be in superb health today, but in time it will decline. You may take pride in your accomplishments, but someone will surpass you.Relationships are like anything else. The return you get depends on what you invest.

  • Are you willing to be vulnerable and courageous?

Approachable people are real. They engage with others on a genuine level, and don’t pretend to be someone they’re not. They don’t go out of their way to hide what they think and feel. They have no hidden agenda. Authenticity wins every time.

  • Are you willing to focus on others?

All human beings possess a desire to connect with other people. The need for connection is sometimes motivated by the desire for love, but it can just as easily be prompted by feelings of loneliness, the need for acceptance, the quest for fulfillment or the desire to achieve in business.

To fulfill our desire for relationships, we must stop thinking about ourselves and begin focusing on the people with whom we desire to build relationships. When you stop wor- rying so much about yourself and start looking at others and what they desire, you build a bridge to other people and you become the kind of person others want to be around.

  • Are you willing to learn from other and be teachable?

Each person we meet has the potential to teach us something. All of us can learn things in unlikely places and from unlikely people. But that’s only true if we have the right attitude. If you have a teachable attitude, you will be positioned well to learn from others.  Leaders who think they know everything and shut down other peoples input, very quickly find themselves alone.

Conclusion

You are responsible for developing your talent and the team around you’s talent as well. How do you do this effectively? You do it by becoming a leader who lifts constantly, take people higher, lighten the load, keep adding value and watch your leadership compound.

Lots of Love

Ella

12 things Successful people think

We can learn a lot by observing the most successful among us in action. What thoughts do they have during their day? What makes them tick? Here are 12 of their most powerful thoughts.

We can learn a lot by observing the most successful among us in action. What thoughts do they have during their day? What makes them tick? Here are 12 of their most powerful thoughts.

1. I love my job!

The most successful have taken the time to find out who they are and what makes them tick. Their work resonates with every fiber of their being, and they love what they do.

2. I will see this through.

Even when things are looking grim or there are huge obstacles in the way of success, remarkably successful people persevere toward the achievement of their goals.

3. I will find a better way.

When they see that a system isn’t working any longer, they brainstorm ideas for making something that is broken work again.

4. I have my day mapped out.

They schedule out their day and conquer their top priorities first, crossing tasks off their list as they are accomplished.

5. I might stumble, but I will not fall.

Successful people know that they won’t succeed at everything and that there will be those inevitable failures. They turn these failures into learning experiences and keep going strong, knowing the next success is right around the corner.

6. I have the time.

Successful people find the time to achieve their goals of the day, even if it means getting up at 5 a.m. or working late into the night.

7. I will continue to grow as a person.

The most successful people aren’t searching for perfection and instead have an insatiable curiosity and thirst for learning new things and ways of doing things. They have a deep desire to grow personally and professionally and learn as much as they can along their way to huge success.

8. I create my own success.

They don’t rely on others to pave their way to success. They truly believe that through their commitment, work ethic, and beliefs, success can be theirs.

9. I am focused on the here and now.

They don’t let past mistakes bog them down and instead live each day as if it is a new, fresh beginning–a new day to lay down the path for accomplishing their goals and even to begin new goals.

10. I have clear goals.

Even if they aren’t necessarily 100 percent sure how they are going to achieve them at first, the most successful people always have clearly defined goals and know where their headed or, at least, where they want to be headed.

11. I know when it’s time to pull the plug.

When others might be tempted to hold on a few more days or weeks, the most successful people have an innate ability to know when the pursuit of a particular goal needs to end–that defining moment when they come to the realization that continued pursuit is a waste of their time and resources.

12. I am so thankful for what I have.

They never forget to be thankful for what and whom they have in their lives and the successes they have achieved. They appreciate the support from family, friends, and colleagues and make sure to let them know how appreciated they are on a regular basis.

From Career to Calling

Most people miss this one. This fundamental issue that troubles us, haunts us, pulls our hair by the stars. It’s our calling. Most people focus on making a living and not on creating a life.

“Some wake up to an Alarm. Some Wake up to a calling” -UNKNOWN

Most people miss this one. This fundamental issue that troubles us, haunts us, pulls our hair by the stars. It’s our calling. Most people focus on making a living and not on creating a life.

Most people fall into 3 groups:

  • You do a job
  • You build a career
  • You fulfil your calling

Author Frederick Buechner said that your purpose is at “that place where your deep gladness meets the world’s deep need.” When you find your calling- when you find what is calling you, it will result in you merging your skills, talents, character traits and experiences. It will make use of your experience, you gifts, and the lessons you’ve learned. It will be represented by a deep desire to create, lead, inspire and make a difference. Take a look at this table by Dr John C Maxwell:

CareerCalling
Mainly about youMainly about others
Something you chooseSomething chosen for you
Separated from your best lifeIntegrated into your entire life
You can take it or leave itNever leaves you
Something you can doSomething you must do
Measured by successMeasured by significance

When you find your calling – your why -you find the reason why you exist, your purpose for living. You are excited everyday for the rest of your life. People know you for YOUR ENERGY and EXCITEMENT for life.

  • When you find your why – you find YOUR WAY.
  • When you find your why you find YOUR WILL.
  • When you find your why you find YOUR WINGS.

To get the rest of this Article which includes the Teaching Podcast, click here:

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Autonomy

Today we learn about Autonomy in the workplace. Through this lesson, you will learn how to define autonomy and gain insight into how the concept works in personal, and organisational contexts.

Definition of Autonomy

Every day we make countless decisions about everything from what to wear in the morning to what to eat for dinner. In most cases, we never stop to think about why we’re making these decisions nor do we pay much attention to the fact that no one is helping us to make them. If you stop and think about it, though, we have not always had the power to make decisions for ourselves; rather, we are granted this power as we grow older. The power to make our own decisions without the interference from others is what’s known as autonomy, and in nearly every sphere of life, it is incredibly important.

Autonomy is a term used to describe a person’s  ability to make decisions, or speak and act on their own behalf, without interference from another party. 

The importance of autonomy at work

Autonomy, in its simplest definition, is the urge to direct your own life. It’s something we want in both our professional and personal lives, but having autonomy at work (or not having it!) has taken on a pressing new meaning. Autonomy in the workplace isn’t just about managing our actions – it’s about choice; to be able able to choose and actually create our options.

The importance of autonomy in the workplace can’t be minimized. It has a knock-on effect on productivity, creativity and the quality of work produced, as well as work satisfaction and workplace trust. Without the ability to control what, when, and how we work – and even who we work with – we’ll never be fully motivated to complete a task… Nor will we want to stay with a company for very long. People simply won’t invest in a workplace that doesn’t respect their ability to manage their own professional space.

In our new era of “employee experience”, people expect to feel empowered at work. They want to feel valued and have a sense of ownership. If they don’t, most will simply up and leave. And where people feel oppressed and unhappy, neither promotions nor pay rises will fix the problem. In fact, one study found that people were two and a half times more likely to take a job that offered more autonomy than more influence.

While most managers recognize micro-management is bad for business, few have put strategies in place to actively support its solution: work autonomy. And yet, most of us – 79% according to one study – have experienced the pains of having too little autonomy in the workplace. As expectations of what we want from our jobs and employers develop, so too does our desire for greater autonomy. Here’s why building greater autonomy at work should be a top priority for every company – and how to practically go about it.

Steps to Build Autonomy in the Workplace

These Notes are from the “No Limits” Radio Programme on Impact 103fm!! Should you wish to get access to the teaching Audio, Join the Tribe:
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How To Be A Happy And Productive Remote Worker

Some challenges of remote work include feelings of loneliness, isolation, and disconnection. However if you get the right mix – you can become most productive as a remote worker. I truly believe that putting good learnings into place will help those working remotely for the first time—or for the fortieth time—be their best remote working selves.

This post was documented on the 15th March – 1 Month Ago!!!! Now this may become a lifestyle so a great read – Recycled!!!

Remote Working

Whether you’ve been working remotely for a decade (like me!) or are just getting started on your remote working journey, there are ways of making sure it’s a delight instead of a total drag. 

For the many that are forced to embrace our way of working now -there may be fear, anxiety and a lot of uncertainty. But to be honest its the best way to work i feel and for years i have belonged to remote organisations and have been attending church remotely, conferences remotely and have absolutely loved being connected even though i was not physically in that room. So embrace this season to become more tech savvy.

In a recent survey, 77% of respondents reported greater productivity when working remotely compared to working in an office setting. In a different survey, 82% of respondents reported feeling happier when working remotely. 

However, remote work is not all sunshine and yoga pants. 

Some challenges of remote work include feelings of loneliness, isolation, and disconnection. However if you get the right mix – you can become most productive as a remote worker. I truly believe that putting good learnings into place will help those working remotely for the first time—or for the fortieth time—be their best remote working selves.

What Is Remote Work?

I’m going to define remote work as “working from home, collaborative spaces (or wherever you choose) as a discipline.”

This means you’re treating remote work with an appropriate amount of respect and thoughtfulness at both an individual and at a team level. 

You’re constantly trying to better yourself as a remote worker, and build a balanced remote culture within your team. The next most important thing is for your team to develop a shared context. A shared context means everyone is playing by the same rules, understands the team’s rituals and practices, and feels that they are operating in an equitable environment.

A normal programme at the Leadership Academy SA.  Some people are in offices, some people are working remotely. Can you tell?

Most people who work on Leadership Academy SA activities  do so remotely. We decided to go down that road early on when we were a startup because remote work enabled us to meet anytime and anywhere, we get to hire the best people regardless of location, develop a results-oriented culture, and scale our processes digitally.

So how did we do it?

Let’s first explore what it really means to be a “remote worker” because that’s the first step to success. 

Working From Home Does Not Equal Remote Work

In a lot of companies, “working from home” is synonymous with well, not really working.

One of the biggest misconceptions about remote work is that we’re all just sitting around in our yoga pants, binging Netflix, and doing our laundry. I think this comes from a mentality that, if you can’t see someone, how do you truly “know they are working?”

That’s got to be the first cultural myth to dispel in any organization that is really, sincerely willing to give remote work a fair chance. When remote work is your day-to-day reality, and not a wink wink nudge nudge exception, it becomes imperative to figure out the best ways to work.

People have different times where their energy peaks and you will see their are extremely productive – for some its 11pm at night and for others its 4am- remote workers get to schedule their time around this productivity. the worst thing is to be stuck on a commute during your most productive thinking time. So here are some insights on how to develop a remote working plan.

LASA’s Rules For Remote Work

We’ve developed a list of rules and practices that help maintain a shared context and help our team work together no matter where they are located.

1. Assume Remote

If even one person on your team is not in an office, assume remote. This means that you should take meetings from your desk and make sure to share all context of said meeting in a recording of some sort – either written – but i actually just share the link of the actual recording as soon as possible.


2. Have A Dedicated Office Space With A Door That Closes

When you’re working remotely full time, it’s important to designate and optimize a workspace that is not your kitchen counter or living room couch. I have dedicated Home office. Which is private and very beautiful, it’s my haven for productivity.

The door that closes is about making sure you’re creating the mental space to focus. This means having dedicated childcare when you’re working, just as you would if you were working in a traditional office environment.

3. Have The Tools To Do Your Job. 

Every team needs to use a defined digital toolset and every individual needs to have a strong internet connection. For example, we use Zoom for video meetings, Watsapp for chat,  Google Docs for sharing docs. Your toolset may be different, but defining it as a team is important for developing that shared context.

4. Communicate, Communicate, Communicate 

Follow the Rule of Seven, which states that people need to hear a message seven times before they’ll internalize it. If you feel like you’re over-communicating information, you’re probably communicating just the right amount.

5. Schedule Face Time

Make sure your team has the opportunity to meet and bond in person. Having regular off-sites is key to fostering human relationships that make working remotely function better and more smoothly.

Working remotely only works in organisations where Leadership Abilities are high – like ours. The reality is we are an organisation built on trust, purpose and autonomy. These are things we have cultivated for year. I guess it true that leaders keep climbing the tallest tree and keep a good vision of changing terrains. If you haven’t been fortunate for gearing your team to work remotely, maybe now would be a good time.

Reach out to us to assist helping you develop a plan to keep your greatest asset healthy in this very tumultuous time

with Love

Ella

Accountability

The 4Cs of Accountability

Too many people preach about accountability as a maxim for others to follow. The 4Cs of Accountability is a method for you to follow, and me too. Management, leadership, and sales books all drive home the same point when it comes to accountability:

“Accountability is the glue that ties commitment to the result,” Bob Procter

Watch Video with notes illustrations

Download Tool

Get the Tool that was shown in the video here, you can use this with your team, or coaching client, or family member. You are welcome.

Listen to the Podcast here:

Accountability is the key to success!!!

Download Tool

Get the Tool that was shown in the video here, you can use this with your team, or coaching client, or family member. You are welcome.

“Surround yourself with people who remind you more of your future than your past.” — Dan Sullivan

The best time of the Year!!!

this the time where I reflect and review my year and plan the following one. I learned this practice from Dr John C Maxwell, about how he and his wife use this time fo the year to review the year and re-prioritise the plans for the new year etc.

This is by far the very best time of the year for me. Besides Christmas being totally awesome all by itself, where Christ changes the trajectory of our lives, but also because this the time where I reflect and review my year and plan the following one. I learned this practice from Dr John C Maxwell, about how he and his wife use this time fo the year to review the year and re-prioritise the plans for the new year etc.

So I guess you can guess what I have been doing this past couple of days!!! Reviewing 2019, and building the anticipation for a new year of absolute growth and development.

Looking back at 2019, and doing proper reflection makes me super grateful for all I have accomplished, I am always so hard on myself in the daily grind, thinking I should do more, and why didn’t I get that done – but I have set in motion so many things that will bring in a reward in the next few years and for this I am super proud of myself.

Theres a Tool I have developed Called To2020&Beyond!!! – its a Coaching Tool, a Life Map a Compass – that I use every year!!!

Download a complimentary Copy Here and Enjoy !!!

Lots of Love and Light

Ella

The Entreprenuers Growth Planner

I have created an Entrepreneurial Growth Planner here and you are welcome to access and utilise to set up your 2020 Growth Plan.

Setting God-Goals is what we as Children of God are meant to do !! And for ~entreprenuers this especially true. This is the time of the year to set 2020 up for Success……

I have created an Entrepreneurial Growth Planner here and you are welcome to access and utilise to set up your 2020 Growth Plan.

From the No Limits Show today 13/12/2019

Secrets to happiness

Want to ensure you do your best to retain employees, and build a strong culture of employee engagement? You’ll want a happy team. Here are the 10 most important factors in employee happiness.

10 Secrets to Employee Happiness

Want to ensure you do your best to retain employees, and build a strong culture of employee engagement? You’ll want a happy team. Here are the 10 most important factors in employee happiness.

A survey of a whopping 203,756 people from 189 countries by Boston Consulting Group last year reveals some interesting factors in employee happiness and it’s a fascinating read. In this article, we’ll cover the ten most important factors, and how you can easily contribute to them.One of the biggest takeaways from the top ten factors is that unsurprisingly to many, relationships, company values and work-life balance all appear.Many traditional business owners make the wrong assumption that employees are only after the most money in their pockets, yet they could not be further from the truth.In the results below, you’ll find that salary comes in as the eight most important factor; in fact, company financial stability is in fifth place, showing that employees are happier knowing their employers are financially sound, over their own salary expectations.Ready for the list of employee happiness factors? Here they are…

10. Company values

Does your organisation have a set of defined values and do you actually utilise them? The worst environment for an employee is have a set of values which everyone in a company outright ignores. It’s worse than not having a set of value at all, in our opinion.If you don’t have values, or have a set of values or mission statement that is not reflective of your culture, we recommend creating them, in conjunction with your team.

9. Interesting job content

Doing the same repetitive tasks day in and day out is hard work. Consider breaking up your employees week by having them ‘buddy’ up with someone from another department, or get them working for a few hours a week on something charitable.A great question to pitch is ‘If you could remove one part of your role, what would it be?’. This quickly highlights employee pain points.

8. Attractive fixed salary

This one is tricky, unless you have a very healthy profit margin. Obviously, we should do our best to pay our team what they are worth, and what we could afford as employers.When it comes down to money, employees are shy to broach the subject, so take it by the horns and discuss their concerns openly.

7. Job security

Who wants to feel nervous about their position each week? Having a regular discussion around the company direction, and where you hope everyone with you will be in the future.This does great things to set a positive tone and also reiterates that you want them to stick around.

6. Learning and career development

To get the most of your employees, you need to regularly invest in your team’s knowledge. There are many options here, from conferences to in-house training, webinars and more.Even mentoring where you pair less experienced team members with senior people has been shown to be highly effective to continually challenge and grow the knowledge of your people.

5. Company’s financial stability

Most organisations are reluctant to openly share their financials with their whole team, yet the profitability and therefore longevity of an organisation is often questioned by those within the team.We suggest perhaps sharing a rough guide; an example could be ‘Sales are up 5% on last year, and we look good to do even better into the next financial year’.Your employees trust you to do the best; you should expect the same confidence in return.

4. Good relationship with superiors

We’ve all been in that position; being subservient to someone you can’t get along with, no matter how hard you try. Whilst employees don’t need to be absolutely best friends with their supervisors and colleagues, it is expected that people can remain respectful, honest and open with one another.Look for small signs that there is conflict among your team, and speak privately to those involved; it’s quite often just a case of clearing the air in a respectful and dignified way.

3. Good work-life balance

For many people, flexibility with work hours and location is now a large component of what they consider when looking for employment, or changing careers. Do you have the ability to allow for remote working, or allow for flexible hours in your organisation?.Demanding employees put in 70 hour weeks is a great way to ensure they end up burned out, and not productive. Keep a focus on ensuring your team work hard, but for a reasonable period, and have a good life and work balance.

2. Good relationships with colleagues

As stated with point four, relationships are tantamount for a good working experience. There’s nothing worse than being stuck in a team with someone whose personality completely polar opposite to yourself!This is hard to judge of course, and there is no easy grading scale to show how relationships among your employees work, however be mindful of how everyone treats each other.Ready for the most important factor in employee happiness? It is by far one of the easiest to address!

1. Appreciation for your work

This does not need to be a solid gold expensive watch either; a simple thank you, particularly publicly is free to do, and very positive. Small gestures as buying an employee a lunch, or saying thank you via email to the team can also be great avenues to show appreciation and lift morale.

Workplace of the 21st Century

The Generational Melting Pot

Sam is a 22 years old, and an enthusiastic new starter at your organization. This is the career that she has wanted since high school and, now that she’s got her degree and joined your team, she’s impatient to impress her new colleagues with her ambition and creativity. But she soon finds the going tough. Some of her fellow team members don’t seem to appreciate her eagerness, and they are wary of her ideas and suggestions. But she soon finds the going tough.

The team is a mixed bunch. Some are middle-aged and others are nearing retirement, and have been at the company for years. They feel that Sam doesn’t understand the way that things get done in the organization. Her enthusiasm and energy is starting to wane as she feels worn down by their reluctance to consider new ideas. So much has changed in the way our customers engage with our products, but all Sam gets is a deaf ear, raised eye-brows and dis-engagement.

Sam isn’t alone. Around the world and across industries, more generations than ever before are working together. Increasingly, it’s younger employees who are leading older team members , turning the established order on its head. This new scenario can cause problems, but it also presents opportunities for sharing knowledge and experience. This article explores how to thrive within a multi-generational workplace.

In days gone by, it was common for just two age groups to be represented in the workplace. There were long-serving, “dyed-in-the-wool” old-timers and ambitious newcomers. Times have changed, and now you could find yourself working with as many as five generations. Broadly speaking, each one has its own set of preferences, styles, perspectives, and experiences.

Introducing the Generations

This table shows the different age groups that are in the labor force today. It describes their traits and characteristics, and how they are frequently stereotyped.

Recent findings show that Millennials  are the biggest generation in the U.S. workforce, followed closely by Generation X  and the Baby Boomers. Silents are a small minority, and the youngest generation – the Zs – are just starting to enter the workforce.

The Potential – and the Pitfalls – of Multi-Generational Workplaces

Generational diversity has great potential. People from different generations can grow and learn from one another as they are exposed to one another’s ideas and experiences. The new perspectives they gain can spark new ideas and prompt new ways of working.

However, the potential for conflict and misunderstanding is very real. Intergenerational conflict within the workplace is a growing issue. A 2011 study found that “intergenerational cohesion” is one of the top three workplace risks.

Different generations can struggle to understand one another’s values and working styles. Working together and sharing power can be problematic. And as more people delay their retirement, younger generations can feel that their opportunities for career advancement are being restricted.

Six Strategies for Multi-Generational Harmony

So, now that our workplaces are more generationally diverse than at any time in history, but at risk of conflict because of this, how do we all work together harmoniously? Here are six strategies for thriving within a multi-generational mix.

1. Establish Respect

It doesn’t matter how old or how experienced we are, we all crave respect. And, just as newcomers need to respect older generations’ seniority and experience, so long-servers need to adjust to and respect the talent and potential of younger generations. Only when each group respects the other can both thrive.

The key to respecting other generations is to understand and accept that they are different  from yours. Consider what motivates people from different generations, what experiences they might have had, and what their working styles are likely to be. The table above can help you.

2. Be Flexible and Accommodating

When you understand what makes other generations “tick,” being able to accommodate their needs and preferences, where practical, can help to prevent division and conflict.

Each generation has its wants and needs, and values different ways of working. Older generations often have fewer responsibilities and costs at home and they appreciate the opportunity to work part-time or reduced hours, so that they can enjoy the benefits and rewards of a lifetime’s work. But an increasing number of Generation Xers are part of the “sandwich generation ,” responsible for caring for both elders and children alongside their work. And for members of Generation Y, a sociable life outside of work is often just as important as their career.

3. Avoid Stereotyping

It’s easy to stereotype different groups. For example, if you’re a Baby Boomer, you may think of Millennials as tech-obsessed and lacking in people skills. To Generation Z, Boomers may seem to be stubborn and inflexible.

Everyone is unique so, instead of assuming the worst, fight your unconscious bias  and accept individuals based on their merits, rather than as “typical” members of particular generations. Remember, chances are, somebody may be stereotyping you! You can change their perceptions and attitude by demonstrating a willingness to listen to new ideas or suggestions, and, as we explore below, by sharing your knowledge and expertise.

4. Learn From One Another

The different generations have a wealth of knowledge and experience that they can share.

The Boomers in your team, for example, can pass on the knowledge, information, useful contacts, and perspectives that they have developed during their years at work. In return, a Generation Y colleague can help them to get to grips with recent innovations, such as the latest developments in social media and viral marketing.

Successful multi-generational teams identify, value and build on one another’s skills and experiences. This focus on individual strengths, rather than on generational differences, is a key part of thriving in the modern workplace.

5. Tailor Your Communication Style

The generations often have their preferred methods of communication. Silents and Boomers tend to use one-on-one, telephone or written communication, whereas Generations X and Y tend to like emails and texts. Generation Z generally prefers the collaborative interaction of social media.

Generations differ in the degree of formality they use, too. Older team members tend to be more formal, whereas their younger colleagues will more likely use colloquialisms, abbreviations and “emojis” – small digital images and icons that are used in messages to represent ideas or emotions. This is more suited to personal or less important messages or communications. Serious or important messages are probably not the best times to use smiley face emojis!

Sticking rigidly to your own favored means and style of communication  can alienate others, so, although it might not feel natural, try to tailor your communication to suit the recipient whenever it’s appropriate.

6. Don’t Overlook the Similarities

Focus on the things that unite you with colleagues of all generations, rather than dwelling on the differences.

You might struggle at first to find similarities between yourself and older or younger team members. But, however stark the differences might appear to be, research suggests that there are more similarities than differences across the generations. After all, most people like to feel engaged with their work, to receive fair pay, to achieve, to build a better quality of life, to be happy and respected, and so on. Likewise, many of us share the same grumbles, such as feeling overworked and underpaid!

Key Points

Multi-generational workplaces can host as many as five generations. Having people who were born between the 1920s and the 1990s work together creates the potential for creativity and innovation, but also for conflict and misunderstanding.

You can avoid these pitfalls and thrive through:

  • Staying respectful, flexible and understanding.
  • Avoiding stereotypes.
  • Being open to learning from others, and helping them to learn from you.
  • Adapting your communication style.
  • Focusing on similarities between individuals, rather than on generational differences.

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